2015 Projects
   
e/h/art 89      
       
       
Noh The Modern Music Box Visualization of Sound Cyber Cookies
Noh The Modern Music Box Visualization of Sound Cyber Cookies
Eve Yuan and Victor Han Anna Liu Jiaxin Li and Sharon Yang Ker Lee Yap
It is said that when one sees their doppelganger, they will die. In this project, we construct an animated digital doppelganger of you and project it into the physical world, exploring the ever-easier loss of identity and personal information control in our increasingly digital age. Take a few pictures with us and give us a little information, and we'll be able to clone you and control your image. How do you feel about your face being used by someone else? The music box, a beloved hallmark of childhood, utilizes a mechanism that has persisted for over a thousand years. This piece is a fresh take on automated musical instrumentation, replacing the plucked metal comb with a single-antenna theremin. The theremin is a lesser-known musical instrument that is perhaps best known for being played without ever being touched, instead using the distance from the closest conducting object to determine the pitch. This project consists of a camera, a few microphones, and a monitor. The setup films its surrounding and displays real-time video stream with the audio converted to graphics. Users can interact with the video camera and experience the disorientating effect of the ability to "see" the sounds. Do you know what cookies are in your computer? Using flour, sugar and circuitry, this project presents browser cookies in an interactive physical form. All dressed up in icing and sparkling LEDS, the cookies are clamoring to get to know you. So come meet your cookies, but watch out, they might have more information about you than you think!
Chain Reacthand Virus To Train a Mockingbird Facial Decomposition
Chain Reacthand Virus To Train a Mockingbird Facial Decomposition
Derek Kearney Jingwen Wang Chas Blakemore and Andy Keller Sam Szuflita
Chain Reacthand is wearable electronic device that allows the user to enter into a chaotic loop of lights, sensors, and electricity. When the user flexes any one of their fingers, a flex sensor triggers a light pulse to be sent up the arm through an LED strip. When the pulse reaches the end of the strip, a small muscle stimulating electrode fires, causing the user to flex another finger and continue the chain reaction. A major idea in transhumanism is the notion of uploading human consciousness to a machine to immortalize a person in a way the human body cannot accommodate. Although this is not yet possible to achieve, humans and machines are becoming more intertwined in their existences. 3D printers are becoming more and more popular for tasks like printing organs and prosthetics, which are then integrated into the human body. Bugs or glitches in software could conceivably cause malfunctions in these products and lead to serious repercussions. Virus draws inspiration from glitch art to visualize weaknesses and shortcomings in data storage through 3D-printed humanoid figures. Whistle at this artificial mockingbird, and listen as it whistles back to you, learning from each whistle along the way. This project consists of taking live recordings of individuals whistling as input to a generative machine learning algorithm, updating a cumulative "understanding" of human whistle patterns at each recording, and subsequently whistling back at each participant and those around them. Facial recognition software relies on efficient representations of the human face. These representations can be dehumanizing and visually grotesque. By confronting these representations face to face, the viewer can explore the effect that facial recognition software has on one's identity.
Shared Space 3D Doodler model and Shadow Art Mirror into the Eye of the Machine Human Glitch Art
Shared Space 3D Doodler model and Shadow Art Mirror into the Eye of the Machine Human Glitch Art
Catherine Pavlov Stephanie Tan Megan Keehan and Ingrid Fiedler Emily Mazo
Step into a new world of light and color. This project explores creating shadow art using 3D printing pen using ABS plastic. Using 3D printing pen, 3D sculptures can be made to create 2D artwork on a surface when light is placed in specific angle. The goal is to demonstrate making shadow patterns from irregular shape. How does a machine perceive us, and how is it different from our own perceptions of ourselves? This project contrasts the view of human eyes and the view of the eye of the Microsoft Kinect. By presenting the viewer with a 3D image of themselves staring back, we empower the user to subjectively experience the objective view of the machine. In the past two decades, great leaps have been made in the attempt to link human disease to genetic mutations and genetic predisposition. In the same way that changing computer code to a random message that a compiler cannot understand (leading to "glitchy" graphics or videos), genetic mutations lead to phenotypes different from those we would expect from pristine human DNA. Human Glitch Art is a collection of candid photographs, each containing information about a different genetically-linked disease. Inside each photograph is hidden a compressed file, as described in the caption of each photograph, taken from a journal article announcing the discovery of a genetic cause of the disease in question. Human Glitch Art explores the hidden nature of genetic time-bombs, which we may carry with us for decades, invisible to the eye, before manifestation of disease.
Game Hoverboard
Game Hoverboard Mood Lighting
Andy Zhou and Harrison Miller Harry Golash Colin Murphy
Take control, or be controlled. You must work together to save the Princess. This project allows observers to experience a floating platform used for personal locomotion, by making use of an illusion of levitation. The device used in this performance piece is designed to replicate a hoverboard that may be one day used by mankind, at least on an aesthetic and performance level. Futurists and artists have often fantasized what it would mean for humans to transcend gravity with the use of personal flying vehicles. Historically, artists have used visual media such as paintings to express what they envisioned future technology would be like. One such example is Villemard, who in the year 1910 printed postcards with images depicting personal flying vehicles being commonly used by mankind in the year 2000. The goal of this project is to take the depiction of a vision of the future beyond just visual media. The artist here intends for observers to experience a future device first-hand by beholding a live performance of his model. A demonstration of how the addition of technology to the human body can enhance the human experience. Using body attached motion sensors, body mounted lighting enhances the sense of emotion and mood from motion. Lights change in color, intensity, and tempo as the wearer moves and changes velocity, and gives a sense of life to static figures by always having at least some motion.